Media Coverage


2007

By signing Kyoto Protocol, Rudd has set a binding target

By signing Kyoto Protocol, Rudd has set a binding target

Marilyn Shepherd, Kensington, SA Climate alternative Noting that Kyoto failed to include the quarter of emissions from deforestation in its controls, Sven Wunder and Frances Seymour reported that at Bali and beyond, fixing this is high on the UN agenda ("Seeing REDD to save the forests and the planet", December 14, p23). Apparently it’s difficult to come up with effective mechanisms to prevent forest destruction. Those developing nations just don’t seem to value their carbon sinks like we do.


Evidence of progress emerges at Bali talks

Evidence of progress emerges at Bali talks

Environmentalists said the plan to protect forests was a good start, but some had reservations about its implementation. Frances Seymour, director for the Center for International Forestry Research, a nonprofit U.S. group, voiced concern that the system was vulnerable to corruption and could be undermined by a growing demand for biofuels. Global demand for palm oil, a popular biofuel, has increased sharply in recent years and has led to the widespread clearing of tropical forests to make way for palm plantations.


Bali: hay que detener la deforestación de África

Bali: hay que detener la deforestación de África

La deforestación es responsable de la emisión anual de 1.600 millones de toneladas de carbono, lo que representa a nivel mundial una quinta parte de la cantidad total, y dos veces más que la aportación de la combinación total de los sectores mundiales de la energía y el transporte intensivo, según el Centro Internacional para la Investigación Forestal (CIFOR, en sus siglas inglesas) con sede en Indonesia.



In Bali, new incentive for developing nations to curb emissions

In Bali, new incentive for developing nations to curb emissions

The bottom line: Developing countries could pocket from $2.3 billion to $23 billion a year from avoiding deforestation under REDD, according to Frances Seymour, director general of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Jakarta, Indonesia. The range reflects different assumptions about the price of carbon on international markets and on the expanse of forest involved. And as talks on crafting a framework for negotiating a successor to the Kyoto Protocol wind down here, REDD looks as though it will be incorporated into that framework, analysts here say.


AFRICA: Tackling deforestation is critical

AFRICA: Tackling deforestation is critical

Deforestation is responsible for 1.6 billion tonnes of carbon emissions every year, amounting to one-fifth of the global total, and to more than the combined total contributed by the world’s energy-intensive transport sectors, according to the Indonesia-based Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).
Similar version of the article also appeared in UN Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN) and All Africa com.


Rainforest protection plan takes shape

Rainforest protection plan takes shape

Environmentalists said the plan to protect forests was a good start, but some had reservations about its implementation. Frances Seymour, director for the Center for International Forestry Research, a nonprofit U.S. group, voiced concern that the system was vulnerable to corruption and could be undermined by a growing demand for biofuels. Global demand for palm oil, a popular biofuel, has increased sharply in recent years and has led to the widespread clearing of tropical forests to make way for palm plantations.


Après Bali, la forêt aura un prix. >

Après Bali, la forêt aura un prix. >

"C’est une excellente nouvelle pour la deuxième période d’engagement du protocole de Kyoto en 2012. Mais la protection de la forêt est aussi indispensable à la biodiversité, à la vie des populations qui en dépendent et à leur intégrité culturelle" souligne Frances Seymour, directrice du Centre international pour la recherche forestière, basée en Indonésie. "Les forêts ont obtenu ici des incitations financières et l’attention politique. Le problème dans ce scénario est de veiller au respect des droits des communautés indigènes: qui va les rémunérer si elles veulent protéger leur forêt mais que leurs droits de propriété ne sont pas reconnus", demande-t-elle.
Similar version of the article also appeared in AFP, L’Expansion and La Depeche.



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